ORMALVI (Dichlorphenamide) Tablets

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ORMAVLI is for patients with Primary Periodic Paralysis (PPP), including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, hypokalemic periodic paralysis and related variants.1

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NOT ACTUAL PATIENT

ORMALVI is a proven treatment for Primary Periodic Paralysis.2 It is the same proven dichlorphenamide you may be familiar with,2 accompanied by Cycle VitaTM, a dedicated support platform which can provide you with individualized product support*, including:

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Co-pay Assistance Program*: On ORMALVI, if you’re commercially insured you may pay as little as $0.

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Bridge Program*: A free supply of ORMALVI that allows diagnosed patients to begin therapy immediately while Cycle Vita secures appropriate Benefit Verification and Prior Authorization. The Bridge Program may also be requested if you’re an existing ORMALVI patient who is temporarily experiencing disruption in therapy due to insurance coverage.

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Continuous Clinical Product Support: Cycle Vita can provide you with product support to help you manage every aspect of the ORMALVI therapeutic routine, such as clinical education and onboarding onto dichlorphenamide.

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Patient Nutrition Program*: You will have access to on-going personal guidance and education for patients through the duration of therapy. Monthly calls can be up to 30-minutes and are tailored to your type of Primary Periodic Paralysis and any known triggers, to reinforce your clinic's nutrition plan.

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Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker

Download and print our Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker to record details about your attacks. This can help you track your episodes, including when the attack occurred, how long it lasted, and what the possible triggers could have been. Hopefully this will help you understand and manage your attacks better by helping you compile the details of your attacks, recognize what lifestyle changes and treatments have worked, and how the attacks have affected you.

Download Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker
PPP Episode Tacker

Primary Periodic Paralysis (also known as familial periodic paralysis) is a rare disease that causes severe episodes of muscle weakness and/or temporary paralysis due to variations in blood potassium levels.

It is caused by a genetic mutation which is normally inherited from a parent, although not everyone shows symptoms, so you may not know if one of your parents has it too.

There are four main types of Primary Periodic Paralysis:

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Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis – This is the most common type of Primary Periodic Paralysis. Patients with Hypokalemic Primary Paralysis have low potassium levels in their blood. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100,000 people.3

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Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis – Patients with Hyperkalemic Primary Paralysis have high potassium levels in their blood. It occurs in around 1 in 200,000 people.3

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Andersen-Tawil Syndrome - Also known as cardiodysrhythmic periodic paralysis or potassium‐sensitive periodic paralysis. Alongside paralytic attacks, your heart may beat too fast or too slow. With Andersen-Tawil Syndrome, potassium doesn’t move in and out of the cells properly. Andersen-Tawil Syndrome only affects 1 in 1,000,000 people worldwide.4

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Paramyotonia Congenita - Also known as sodium channel myotonia. It is estimated to affect 1 in 100,000 people worldwide.5 The mutation of your muscles’ sodium channel causes higher-than-normal muscle excitation. Over excitation of muscles during brief exercise can trigger stiffness in your muscles.6 The most commonly affected muscles are located in the face, neck and upper extremities, however it can also affect your muscles used for breathing and swallowing.7

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How to get diagnosed

Genetic testing is recommended as the first diagnostic step where there is a high clinical likelihood of a Primary Periodic Paralysis diagnosis.2

Please note that genetic testing only identifies an associated mutation in 60% to 70% of patients with Primary Periodic Paralysis. For the remaining 30% to 40% of patients with Primary Periodic Paralysis, diagnosis can be based upon clinical presentation, blood potassium levels during attacks and pattern abnormalities on long exercise testing.2

Find out more

Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker

Download and print our Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker to record details about your attacks. This can help you track your episodes, including when the attack occurred, how long it lasted, and what the possible triggers could have been. Hopefully this will help you understand and manage your attacks better by helping you compile the details of your attacks, recognize what lifestyle changes and treatments have worked, and how the attacks have affected you.

Download Primary Periodic Paralysis Episode Tracker
PPP Episode Tacker

References

  1. ORMALVI (dichlorphenamide). Prescribing Information. Cycle Pharmaceuticals Ltd.
  2. Statland, J., et al (2017). Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Periodic Paralysis. Muscle & Nerve, [online] 57(4), pp.522–530. Available at:: https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.26009 [Accessed 1 Nov. 2023].
  3. Finsterer, J. (2008). Primary periodic paralyses. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, [online] 117(3), pp.145–158. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0404.2007.00963 [Accessed 1 Nov. 2023].
  4. Medlineplus.gov. (2017). Andersen-Tawil syndrome: MedlinePlus Genetics. [online] Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/andersen-tawil-syndrome [Accessed 1 Nov. 2023]
  5. GOSH Hospital site. (2020). Sodium channel myotonia (paramyotonia congenita). [online] Available at: https://www.gosh.nhs.uk/conditions-and-treatments/conditions-we-treat/sodium-channel-myotonia-paramyotonia-congenita/ [Accessed 2 Jan. 2024].
  6. Muscular Dystrophy Association. (2017). Paramyotonia Congenita (Eulenberg Disease) – Diseases | Muscular Dystrophy Association. [online] Available at: https://www.mda.org/disease/paramyotonia-congenita [Accessed 2 Jan. 2024].
  7. National Organization for Rare Disorders. (2023). Paramyotonia Congenita. [online] Available at: https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/paramyotonia-congenita/#symptoms [Accessed 2 Jan. 2024].

*Some areas of support may not be accessible to all patients. Eligibility criteria may apply to ensure compliance with all applicable federal and state requirements, and benefits may be limited to commercially insured patients only. For more detailed information about eligibility, terms and conditions, please contact the Cycle Vita team at +1 (888) 360-8482.